Peers, more than teachers, inspire us to learn


BroadyEdTech

Important implications for professional development and training and for creating professional learning communities from a research study.  Excerpt:

When it came to final grades, students who received the peer rationale scored an average of 92 percent — significantly higher than the 86 percent scored by students who received the rationale from the instructor. Interestingly, students who received no rationale averaged 90 percent for a final grade, which is still higher than those who received the instructor rationale.

“We found that receiving the instructor rationale led to lower final grades than both the peer rationale and no rationale conditions,” Roseth said. “This gives support to the idea that, motivationally, the fact that instructors control grades, tell the students what do to, and so on, may be working against their efforts to increase their students’ appreciation of why the class is important.”

Source:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170321110341.htm 

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